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  • Volunteering FAQs | Humane Society of the Palouse | Moscow

    Does HSoP euthanize animals? The Humane Society of the Palouse is a low/no-kill shelter. HSoP will not euthanize adoptable animals due to space. We’ve stayed true to our mission for 45 years and are committed to preserving and nurturing the lives of all the rescued animals in our care. We reserve humane euthanasia only in instances when animals are suffering greatly with no potential for relief, or if an animal is so aggressive that he or she presents a danger to people or other animals and cannot be safely handled or placed. The decision to euthanize is never made lightly and done only with the best interest of the animal in mind. HSoP is committed to providing all of the animals we rescue with the individualized and compassionate care they need and deserve until they are adopted by responsible, loving people. How many canines does HSoP help per year? Each year HSoP provides temporary housing for anywhere from 200-300 dogs. How many dogs are returned to their owner, and how many are adopted out per year? For stray dogs that are found within Moscow city limits, HSoP on average will be able to reunite 60% with their owners and 40% will remain in shelter care until adopted. Whereas stray dogs that are found outside of Moscow city limits, HSoP on average will be able to reunite 40% with their owners and 60% will remain in shelter care until adopted. We strongly encourage all pet owners to equip their pets with accurate ID to increase the likelihood of them coming home if they ever get lost. We encourage microchip ID for all pets, and strongly recommend a collar with an ID tag containing the owner's contact number. How many felines does HSoP help per year? Each year HSoP provides temporary housing for anywhere from 200-300 cats. HSoP generally has more cats than dogs How many cats are returned to their owner, and how many are adopted out per year? For stray cats that are found within Moscow city limits, HSoP on average will be able to reunite 10% with their owners and 90% will remain in shelter care until adopted. Whereas stray cats that are found outside of Moscow city limits, HSoP on average will be able to reunite 1% with their owners and 99% will remain in shelter care until adopted. We strongly encourage all pet owners to equip their pets with accurate ID to increase the likelihood of them coming home if they ever get lost. We encourage microchip ID for all pets, and strongly recommend a collar with an ID tag containing the owner's contact number. Cats should wear breakaway collars if possible. How is HSoP funded? For a more detailed view of HSoP finances, visit our Financial Transparency page. How much funding needs to be donated or raised by HSoP to make up the 35% and 8% of the annual budget? Each year, HSoP has to raise over $80,000 through donations and fundraising just to keep our doors open. ​ This is why any size donation is greatly appreciated. Without the generous and continued support of our pet community, HSoP would not be able to do what we do. Donate today! Is the Humane Society of the Palouse part of the Humane Society of the United States? No. HSoP has no affiliation with HSUS or the ASPCA. Though we do look to the national animal welfare organizations to stay current with best practices, we do not receive funding nor are we affiliated with them. HSoP does apply for grants through these large national organizations, however HSoP does not receive annual funding from the HSUS or ASPCA. Who is involved with HSoP? City of Moscow, Chief of Police City of Moscow owns the building and pays for utilities and make up 22% of HSoP yearly budget. Latah county provides 10% of HSoPs’ yearly budget. HSoP presents to the County Commissioners every year to request funding. HSoP Voluntary Board of Directors 14 members who bring a variety of expertise to the organization. HSoP has a full time staff of 5 that include: Shelter Director Animal Care Attendants Public Relations Manager Countless Volunteers Does the Humane Society of the Palouse pick up stray animals? The Humane Society does not pick up animals. Stray dogs found within Moscow city limits can be reported to the Animal Control Officer by calling (208)882-2677. If a stray dog is found in Latah County, citizens can call the Latah County Sheriff’s office at (208)882-2216 for assistance, but do so knowing there is no animal control for Latah County. There is no animal control for stray cats. Where does HSoP list stray or impounded animals? HSoP lists all stray or unclaimed animals on our Facebook page. To see the most recent stray and impounded animals, please visit our Facebook page through this link: Humane Society of the Palouse | Facebook If my pet is missing, could it be at the animal shelter? Hundreds of companion animals come into the shelter every year from Latah County. If your pet is missing, it is important that you contact the shelter as soon as possible so that a missing pet report can be completed and shelter staff can be notified to look for your pet. It is also important that you visit the shelter in-person and look for your pet on a regular basis. Please remember that it is the responsibility of the pet owner to search for their missing pet; however, HSoP will do everything possible to assist you in doing so. We also encourage posting a photo, description and information about where your pet went missing from as well as when to local lost and found groups on Facebook. What happens if my pet is brought to the shelter? If your pet is not readily identifiable by tag or microchip, your pet will be held for a stray holding period. Dogs found in the City of Moscow have a 10-day holding period. Dogs found outside of Moscow but within Latah County have a 6-day holding period. Cats found anywhere within Moscow or Latah County have a 6-day holding period. The Shelter will make every effort to contact you regarding your pet during this time. Reclaim fees apply in each situation and must be paid prior to reclaiming your pet. Unclaimed pets become the property of HSoP following the end of a stray holding period. Once this happens, they start the process of becoming ready for adoption. Please ensure that all of your pets have accurate ID to increase the chance of being reunited with them if they ever get lost. What does it cost to reclaim my pet from the shelter? Pet owners are charged an impound fee of $20.00. To reclaim a dog that lives within Moscow city limits, if the dog is not already licensed with the city, the purchase of a lifetime license is mandatory. The license is $25.00 for altered dogs and $35.00 for intact dogs. Boarding fees of $10.00 per day are charged for each day of impound after the initial twenty-four hours of arrival at the Shelter Do I have to have my pet spayed or neutered? Spaying or neutering is not required for reclaimed pets, although we encourage responsible sterilization of pets and offer assistance through S.N.A.P. Spaying or neutering your pets can prevent unwanted litters and even prevent some cancers in your beloved cat or dog. There are already so many homeless cats and dogs at the shelter, we don't need anymore! If you are in need of assistance having your pet spayed or neutered, please apply for our Spay/Neuter Assistance Program (SNAP). If I witness what I believe to be an act of animal cruelty, who do I call? Humane Society of the Palouse encourages the public to IMMEDIATELY report acts of animal cruelty or neglect to Animal Control by calling (208) 882-2677 if occurring within Moscow city limits, and (208) 882-2216 if occurring in Latah County. HSoP does not have the ability to report cruelty or neglect secondhand. If we are contacted about situations of this kind, we will direct them to contact local law enforcement. Does HSoP offer veterinary services to the pulbic? Though we would love to offer spaying/neutering and vaccination services to our local pet community, HSoP does not have the ability or facilities to do so at this time. HSoP does offer assistance through our Spay/Neuter Assistance Program (SNAP), and microchipping services. For a list of local veterinary services, please view the Veterinary Services resource page in the HSoP Resource Library. Does it cost money to surrender an owned animal? Yes. HSoP does ask for a small donation to help provide care for owned pets that have been surrendered. Please visit our Owner Surrender page to learn more. How old do I have to be to visit the shelter? Anyone is welcome to visit the shelter during our open hours! We do have some restrictions about who can see and interact with shelter pets: - You must be at least 18 years old to enter our dog kennels or to interact with our adoptable dogs without a parent or guardian present. - You must be at least 18 years old to interact with our adoptable cats without a parent or guardian present (unless you're working a junior volunteer shift). - Those 17 and under are welcome to visit the shelter and interact will all of our adoptable pets, so long as they're accompanied by a parent or guardian over the age of 18. I'm going on vacation, can you board my pet? No. At this time HSoP does not offer boarding services for pets. There are several boarding facilities throughout Latah County and most vet clinics will also board. For a list of local boarding services, please view our Pet Boarding Services resource sheet in the HSoP Resource Library. I found a wild animal hurt in my yard, what should I do? HSoP is not equipped care for wildlife. If you've found an injured or orphaned wild bird or animal, please call Palouse Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation at (208) 614-2273. For more information, please visit their website: Palouse Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation I found a feral cat, what do I do? HSoP does not have the ability to provide care for feral cats within our facility. We do have a Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) program for feral cats living on owned property in Latah County. The program intends to reduce feline infectious diseases and homeless cat births in our region, by providing feral cats with vaccines, spay/neuter surgeries, and ear-tips for identification. Why can’t I bring my animal to the Humane Society of the Palouse if I live outside of Latah County? HSoP does not euthanize to make space. We do not have the capacity, space, or manpower to receive animals from outside of the agreed jurisdiction we have with the City of Moscow and Latah County. We recommend contacting the shelter that services your county and they may be able to help.

  • Volunteer | Humane Society of the Palouse | Moscow

    Volunteer Guidelines Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Form The Humane Society is always happy to have volunteers come out and help care for our animals. The animals like new faces as well. ​ Are you interested in Volunteering? Please contact HSoP and schedule your first shift! Due to limited space, HSoP can only accommodate so many volunteers at one time. ​ Volunteer Hours are available Monday through Friday from 2:00-5:00. We can schedule up to three volunteers at a time. ​ Sign up for your shift today! ​ Contact HSoP by phone at (208) 883-1166 or through email at information@humanesocietyofthepalouse.org ​ Do you have questions about volunteering with us? Click here to visit our Volunteering FAQs ! Junior Volunteers Junior Volunteers Junior Volunteer Form Additional Guidelines for Younger Volunteers You must be at least 12 years old to be a junior volunteer. During their first volunteering shift, junior volunteers must be accompanied by a parent or guardian to go over rules, sign the application, and ensure their child understands the process. After the initial supervised shift, junior volunteers can volunteer alone for up to one hour per day. Junior volunteers are not allowed in the dog kennels without their parent or guardian. There is a 3-strikes rule! If we have to remind you about following these rules three times, you will not be allowed to return to volunteer without a parent. HSoP cannot accommodate volunteers under the age of 12 at this time. ***Junior Volunteers can socialize with animals that are already accustomed to younger people. If an animal is not comfortable or socialized with children, you will not be allowed to interact with them.*** Dog Walking Dog Walking Form Our dogs love getting to go on walks! These mini adventures offer a fun break from the shelter environment, and give our pups a chance to practice their leash skills before going home. If you'd like to help our pups get some relaxing walks in, we would love to have your help! ​ If you haven't already, be sure to fill out and submit a volunteer application. ​ Next, fill out and submit the dog walking form above. Be sure to carefully read all guidelines. ​ Just like that, you're all set to walk some dogs! We will ask to hold onto your ID while you're out. ​ ***Junior volunteers cannot walk dogs by themselves. If they are accompanied by an adult parent or guardian, then the junior volunteer can accompany the adult for the walk, but may not control the leash.*** Group Volunteering Group Volunteering Thank you for considering HSoP as the beneficiary of your groups’ philanthropy! Due to space restrictions at HSoP, we are unable to accommodate large groups of volunteers on site. However, groups can do a lot for the animals currently at HSoP by organizing fundraisers, pet food drives, or pet supply collections for the homeless animals of Latah County. While we aren’t able to accommodate groups at our shelter, your group efforts can still make a huge difference to the homeless animals found within your community. After your group has organized a fundraiser, supported a pet food drive for our Pet Food Pantry, or done a supply collection, a tour is a wonderful way to top off the experience! This is a great way for your group to see exactly how your efforts have benefited your pet community. To schedule a group tour, or for fun ideas for group projects, please contact us by phone at (208)883-1166 or through email at information@humanesocietyofthepalouse.org . Fun ideas for how groups can help: ​ Car washes Volunteering at HSoP events Bake sales Supply donation drives Pet food drives Making dog toys Making dog treats Making cat treats Making cat toys Making blankets for our kitties! Our cats and kittens love to lie on handmade blankets. You can knit, crochet, or tie blanks out of fleece. The recommended measurement is about 18-20” x 18-20” when you’re finished. Court-Mandated Community Service Court-Mandated Community Service Information Profile, Code of Conduct/Waiver Thank you for your interest in serving your mandated community service hours at the Humane Society of the Palouse. Individuals seeking to fulfill community service requirements do not participate in the volunteer program: they complete projects and tasks that do not involve any contact with the animals or the clients at the shelter. Community Service Volunteers must read the guidelines, complete information profile, and sign the code of conduct/waiver in order to get started. Please note that the Humane Society of the Palouse reserves the right to refuse a Community Service Volunteer for any reason. Community Service Volunteers must be 18 years of age or older. Volunteers must schedule in advance Time slots available are from 9:30 am – 12:00 pm, Monday – Saturday To sign up, please contact HSoP by phone at (208) 883-1166 HSoP reserves the right to turn away any Community Service Volunteers who do not show up on time, and to ask Community Service Volunteers to leave early if there is not enough work available. Shifts are filled on a first come, first serve basis and HSoP can only accommodate 1 volunteer per day. Duties may include laundry, dishes, sorting donations, cleaning, and more. Dress Protocol To prevent slipping, exposure to harsh cleaning chemicals, and injuries, all Community Service Volunteers must wear flat, enclosed rubber-sole shoes at all times. All Community Service Volunteers must not wear thong sandals, flip flops, or any shoe with an open toe, torn clothing, cut-off shorts, T-shirts with controversial or offensive messages, halter tops, backless shirts, half-shirts, muscle shirts, tank tops, dangling earrings, or other jewelry that may interfere with volunteer duties. DIY Volunteerng Ideas DIY Volunteering Ideas Are you interested in helping HSoP but are unable to come into HSoP during our hours of operation? This page has ideas for how you can still help homeless animals. Did you know that providing homeless dogs and cats with toys is very important for their well-being? The ideas on this page can help you make some very special critters their own toys that are theirs to keep both at HSoP and in their new home. ​ Do you have a large group that would like to help HSoP? These ideas are great for a large group to do together and then bring into HSoP. Under each idea, you will find how many volunteer hours you can receive for donating these DIY items. Stuffed Monkey’s Fist Knot: 1 hour awarded per every 2 toys. Click here for instructions. No-Sew Fleece Blankets: 1 hour awarded per every 2 blankets. Click here for instructions. Fleece Dog & Cat Toy: 1 hour awarded per every 5 toys. Click here for instructions. Flirt Pole: 1 hour awarded per every 2 toys. Click here for instructions. Ball & Tug Dog Toy 1 hour awarded per every 2 toys. Click here for instructions. Check out this fun PDF for even more ideas on DIY dog and cat toys! Does HSoP euthanize animals? The Humane Society of the Palouse is a low/no-kill shelter. HSoP will not euthanize adoptable animals due to space. We’ve stayed true to our mission for 45 years and are committed to preserving and nurturing the lives of all the rescued animals in our care. We reserve humane euthanasia only in instances when animals are suffering greatly with no potential for relief, or if an animal is so aggressive that he or she presents a danger to people or other animals and cannot be safely handled or placed. The decision to euthanize is never made lightly and done only with the best interest of the animal in mind. HSoP is committed to providing all of the animals we rescue with the individualized and compassionate care they need and deserve until they are adopted by responsible, loving people. How many canines does HSoP help per year? Each year HSoP provides temporary housing for anywhere from 200-300 dogs. How many dogs are returned to their owner, and how many are adopted out per year? For stray dogs that are found within Moscow city limits, HSoP on average will be able to reunite 60% with their owners and 40% will remain in shelter care until adopted. Whereas stray dogs that are found outside of Moscow city limits, HSoP on average will be able to reunite 40% with their owners and 60% will remain in shelter care until adopted. We strongly encourage all pet owners to equip their pets with accurate ID to increase the likelihood of them coming home if they ever get lost. We encourage microchip ID for all pets, and strongly recommend a collar with an ID tag containing the owner's contact number. How many felines does HSoP help per year? Each year HSoP provides temporary housing for anywhere from 200-300 cats. HSoP generally has more cats than dogs How many cats are returned to their owner, and how many are adopted out per year? For stray cats that are found within Moscow city limits, HSoP on average will be able to reunite 10% with their owners and 90% will remain in shelter care until adopted. Whereas stray cats that are found outside of Moscow city limits, HSoP on average will be able to reunite 1% with their owners and 99% will remain in shelter care until adopted. We strongly encourage all pet owners to equip their pets with accurate ID to increase the likelihood of them coming home if they ever get lost. We encourage microchip ID for all pets, and strongly recommend a collar with an ID tag containing the owner's contact number. Cats should wear breakaway collars if possible. How is HSoP funded? For a more detailed view of HSoP finances, visit our Financial Transparency page. How much funding needs to be donated or raised by HSoP to make up the 35% and 8% of the annual budget? Each year, HSoP has to raise over $80,000 through donations and fundraising just to keep our doors open. ​ This is why any size donation is greatly appreciated. Without the generous and continued support of our pet community, HSoP would not be able to do what we do. Donate today! Is the Humane Society of the Palouse part of the Humane Society of the United States? No. HSoP has no affiliation with HSUS or the ASPCA. Though we do look to the national animal welfare organizations to stay current with best practices, we do not receive funding nor are we affiliated with them. HSoP does apply for grants through these large national organizations, however HSoP does not receive annual funding from the HSUS or ASPCA. Who is involved with HSoP? City of Moscow, Chief of Police City of Moscow owns the building and pays for utilities and make up 22% of HSoP yearly budget. Latah county provides 10% of HSoPs’ yearly budget. HSoP presents to the County Commissioners every year to request funding. HSoP Voluntary Board of Directors 14 members who bring a variety of expertise to the organization. HSoP has a full time staff of 5 that include: Shelter Director Animal Care Attendants Public Relations Manager Countless Volunteers Does the Humane Society of the Palouse pick up stray animals? The Humane Society does not pick up animals. Stray dogs found within Moscow city limits can be reported to the Animal Control Officer by calling (208)882-2677. If a stray dog is found in Latah County, citizens can call the Latah County Sheriff’s office at (208)882-2216 for assistance, but do so knowing there is no animal control for Latah County. There is no animal control for stray cats. Where does HSoP list stray or impounded animals? HSoP lists all stray or unclaimed animals on our Facebook page. To see the most recent stray and impounded animals, please visit our Facebook page through this link: Humane Society of the Palouse | Facebook If my pet is missing, could it be at the animal shelter? Hundreds of companion animals come into the shelter every year from Latah County. If your pet is missing, it is important that you contact the shelter as soon as possible so that a missing pet report can be completed and shelter staff can be notified to look for your pet. It is also important that you visit the shelter in-person and look for your pet on a regular basis. Please remember that it is the responsibility of the pet owner to search for their missing pet; however, HSoP will do everything possible to assist you in doing so. We also encourage posting a photo, description and information about where your pet went missing from as well as when to local lost and found groups on Facebook. What happens if my pet is brought to the shelter? If your pet is not readily identifiable by tag or microchip, your pet will be held for a stray holding period. Dogs found in the City of Moscow have a 10-day holding period. Dogs found outside of Moscow but within Latah County have a 6-day holding period. Cats found anywhere within Moscow or Latah County have a 6-day holding period. The Shelter will make every effort to contact you regarding your pet during this time. Reclaim fees apply in each situation and must be paid prior to reclaiming your pet. Unclaimed pets become the property of HSoP following the end of a stray holding period. Once this happens, they start the process of becoming ready for adoption. Please ensure that all of your pets have accurate ID to increase the chance of being reunited with them if they ever get lost. What does it cost to reclaim my pet from the shelter? Pet owners are charged an impound fee of $20.00. To reclaim a dog that lives within Moscow city limits, if the dog is not already licensed with the city, the purchase of a lifetime license is mandatory. The license is $25.00 for altered dogs and $35.00 for intact dogs. Boarding fees of $10.00 per day are charged for each day of impound after the initial twenty-four hours of arrival at the Shelter Do I have to have my pet spayed or neutered? Spaying or neutering is not required for reclaimed pets, although we encourage responsible sterilization of pets and offer assistance through S.N.A.P. Spaying or neutering your pets can prevent unwanted litters and even prevent some cancers in your beloved cat or dog. There are already so many homeless cats and dogs at the shelter, we don't need anymore! If you are in need of assistance having your pet spayed or neutered, please apply for our Spay/Neuter Assistance Program (SNAP). If I witness what I believe to be an act of animal cruelty, who do I call? Humane Society of the Palouse encourages the public to IMMEDIATELY report acts of animal cruelty or neglect to Animal Control by calling (208) 882-2677 if occurring within Moscow city limits, and (208) 882-2216 if occurring in Latah County. HSoP does not have the ability to report cruelty or neglect secondhand. If we are contacted about situations of this kind, we will direct them to contact local law enforcement. Does HSoP offer veterinary services to the pulbic? Though we would love to offer spaying/neutering and vaccination services to our local pet community, HSoP does not have the ability or facilities to do so at this time. HSoP does offer assistance through our Spay/Neuter Assistance Program (SNAP), and microchipping services. For a list of local veterinary services, please view the Veterinary Services resource page in the HSoP Resource Library. Does it cost money to surrender an owned animal? Yes. HSoP does ask for a small donation to help provide care for owned pets that have been surrendered. Please visit our Owner Surrender page to learn more. How old do I have to be to visit the shelter? Anyone is welcome to visit the shelter during our open hours! We do have some restrictions about who can see and interact with shelter pets: - You must be at least 18 years old to enter our dog kennels or to interact with our adoptable dogs without a parent or guardian present. - You must be at least 18 years old to interact with our adoptable cats without a parent or guardian present (unless you're working a junior volunteer shift). - Those 17 and under are welcome to visit the shelter and interact will all of our adoptable pets, so long as they're accompanied by a parent or guardian over the age of 18. I'm going on vacation, can you board my pet? No. At this time HSoP does not offer boarding services for pets. There are several boarding facilities throughout Latah County and most vet clinics will also board. For a list of local boarding services, please view our Pet Boarding Services resource sheet in the HSoP Resource Library. I found a wild animal hurt in my yard, what should I do? HSoP is not equipped care for wildlife. If you've found an injured or orphaned wild bird or animal, please call Palouse Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation at (208) 614-2273. For more information, please visit their website: Palouse Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation I found a feral cat, what do I do? HSoP does not have the ability to provide care for feral cats within our facility. We do have a Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) program for feral cats living on owned property in Latah County. The program intends to reduce feline infectious diseases and homeless cat births in our region, by providing feral cats with vaccines, spay/neuter surgeries, and ear-tips for identification. Why can’t I bring my animal to the Humane Society of the Palouse if I live outside of Latah County? HSoP does not euthanize to make space. We do not have the capacity, space, or manpower to receive animals from outside of the agreed jurisdiction we have with the City of Moscow and Latah County. We recommend contacting the shelter that services your county and they may be able to help. Volunteering FAQs Volunteering FAQs

  • SNAP | Humane Society of the Palouse | Moscow

    Spay & Neuter Assistance Program (SNAP) If you have a pet that needs fixed but just can't quite afford the full cost of surgery, we can help. We maintain a special program to help people cover the cost of spaying and neutering their pets. This program is funded entirely by donations. There are no income limits to qualify for assistance, we simply ask that people use this program only if they truly need the help. Additionally, if you have some change to spare to this program, look for our donation banks on store counters all over Moscow. All funding from those banks will directly support SNAP. This is a coupon program open to all residents of Latah County, that need financial assistance with spaying or neutering their pet. We give you a coupon good for money off the price of a spay or neuter. $90.00 towards a spay, and $50.00 towards a neuter. Vouchers can be used at any veterinary office within Latah County, excluding Affordable Vet Care in Moscow. Please note: as of 3/28/2023, Cedar Veterinary Clinic is no longer participating in SNAP. SNAP Application If you need assistance, just drop by the shelter for a form or download and print the application. This form must be completed and then mailed into the address on the form. Please plan ahead when making your spay and neuter appointments, as it can take about two weeks to get the coupon in your hand, and you must have the coupon at the time of appointment. Sorry, but coupons can not be used to cover the expense of prior surgeries. If you have any other questions about this program, please contact us. You can help keep HSoP SNAP going! Please consider contributing to this much needed program. Every penny helps save lives. ​ You can donate online: ​ ​ ​ ​ (Please put "SNAP" in the comment) ​ Mail Checks to: HSoP P.O. Box 8847 Moscow, ID 83483 (Please put "SNAP" as the memo) ​ Or stop by HSoP! 2019 E. White Ave, Moscow ID

  • Quarterly Newsletter Archive | HSoP

    HSoP Quarterly Newsletter Archive Every three months, we send out a quarterly e-newsletter that summarizes all of the important and adorable happenings at HSoP. It details our favorite events and fundraisers, heart-warming adoption stories, acts of kindness from our pet-loving community, and, of course, adorable photos of HSoP animals! If you'd like to join our mailing list and receive these newsletters as soon as they're sent out, be sure to sign up at the bottom of our website. To read through any of our previous newsletters, follow the links below. Quarterly Newsletter 1: April - June 2021 Quarterly Newsletter 2: July - September 2021 Quarterly Newsletter 3: October - December 2021 Quarterly Newsletter 4: January - March 2022 Quarterly Newsletter 5: April - June 2022 Quarterly Newsletter 6: July - September 2022 Quarterly Newsletter 7: October - December 2022 Quarterly Newsletter 8: January - March 2023 Quarterly Newsletter 9: April - June 2023 Quarterly Newsletter 10: July - Septembe r 2023 Quarterly Newsletter 11: October - December 2023 Quarterly Newsletter 12: January - March 2024

  • Get Involved | Humane Society of the Palouse | Moscow

    Get Involved! Our amazing community is truly what makes our work possible. The residents of Moscow and Latah County have continuously shown how much they care for local animals over the last 40 years. There's several ways to get involved in our lifesaving mission! Each year we have the help of countless volunteers who ensure each animal is safe and comfortable in our care. We also have an extremely generous community who funds more than 30% of our shelter expenses through donations! The community effort doesn't end there. Many of our toys, blankets, treats, and carriers have been donated by helpful residents of Moscow and Latah County, and event volunteers make sure our fundraising efforts are successful year after year! There are even some community members who choose a more hands-on approach and get involved by fostering animals still in search of their forever homes. ​ We are always trying to brainstorm more ways our community can get involved in the work we do. If you have any questions or ideas about how you could help us save countless lives, email Lauren, our Public Relations Manager at outreach@humanesocietyofthepalouse.org . Donate Volunteer Foster Shop Thank you for allowing us to help those who cannot help themselves!

  • Board of Directors | Humane Society of the Palouse | Moscow

    Board of Directors Karen Den Braven President Scott Smith Vice President Beverly Rhoades Treasurer Pam Vander Zanden Secretary Susila Bales, DVM Emily Spellman ​ McKenna Caples Sandra Kelly ​ Chris Schwartz ​ Dan Cordon ​ James Johnson (Ding) Jessica Dahlinger ​ Stacey Kingsbury ​ Nate Sletteland

  • Event Volunteering | Humane Society of the Palouse | Moscow

    Event Volunteering HSoP holds several annual fundraising events, many of which require volunteers to ensure the event is running smoothly. Event Volunteering is a great opportunity for clubs, community, business and philanthropic groups to support an organization with a great cause. Soup and Pie Held every February, Soup and Pie is a social luncheon where HSoP supporters can enjoy a bowl of soup and a slice of pie. Volunteers at our soup and pie event are responsible for selling tickets at the door, admitting those with tickets purchased online, serving soup to attendees, and slicing up delicious pie for all of those who came to support our animals. Volunteers are also extremely helpful for the setup and teardown of event materials (tables, chairs, decorations, food, etc.). ​ Paw-Louse 5K Fun Run & Walk Paw-Louse Fun run is a fun outing for all family members (including the furry ones) that starts and ends at the corner of Rail Road and Sweet Ave. Volunteers make this event possible by handing out water and snacks, distributing T-shirts, setting up the 5k route, and helping to keep our participants (people and dogs alike!) on track. Howling at Hamilton The Sunday after Labor Day, at the Hamilton Lowe Aquatic Center, it’s the dogs’ day at the pool. With dog dock diving contest. Volunteers have a great time at this event! Some volunteers collect entrance fees at the gate, while others sell toys and treats to those who attend. A few lucky volunteers will even get to help judge the pool jumping contest! Pet Pictures with Santa Each December, patrons and their pets spread the holiday cheer while posing with Santa. Our volunteers help bring Christmas joy by setting up the photo station, cleaning up after the fact, and keeping our photogenic furry friends entertained. Volunteers also help us to collect the funds from this event. Are you interested in being an event volunteer for HSoP? We would love to have you on our team! Feel free to call us at (208)883-1166 or email Lauren, our Public Relations Manager at outreach@humanesocietyofthepalouse.org . Thank you for thinking of our animals!

  • City of Moscow Dog License | Humane Society of the Palouse | Moscow

    City of Moscow Dog Licensing Did you know that all dogs living within the city limits of Moscow need to be licensed with the City of Moscow? We can help with that! The Humane Society can only accept cash or check payments for City of Moscow fees. ***If you would like to pay with a card, we recommend licensing your dog at the Moscow Police Department.*** HSoP Hours of Operation : ​ M onday through Saturday from 1:00-6:00pm , dog kennels close at 5:00pm Lifetime tag costs: ​ $25.00 for a spayed or neutered dog ​ $35.00 for an intact dog City of Moscow Dog License

  • After Adoption | Humane Society of the Palouse | Moscow

    After Adoption 7-Day Health Guarantee and Foster Period ​ We provide a 7-day health guarantee for each pet adopted from our facility. Within the first 7 days of adoption, if you discover a medical condition that existed prior to adoption, we’ll work with our vet partner, Animal Clinic and Hospital , to provide medical attention at no charge to you. During the first seven days, all medical decisions must be approved by HSoP. If you notice a non-emergent medical concern during your 7-day foster period, please contact HSoP before seeking vet care so we can arrange with Animal Clinic. The first 7 days are a trial period, we call it a foster period. This gives you time to decide for certain whether the adoption was a good fit for you and your family. We understand that 7 days is not very much time to get to know your new friend, or for your new pet to relax and feel completely comfortable. If you would like to have more time together before making a final decision, please contact HSoP. Any time after adoption, please feel free to contact HSoP for any counseling needs you may have with your new family member. We will always do our very best to help. How to help your new family member adjust during their transition from shelter to a home. When you bring your new dog or cat home from the shelter, it's a day for celebration. However, try to look at things from your new friends’ point of view before jumping into any festivities. He has left a busy, noisy environment and is traveling in a car with new people he does not know to a place he does not know. It is no surprise that he may be a little anxious or overwhelmed. Be patient. This is a huge change for your new pet! Even though all the humans involved know this is a positive change, remember to give your new friend the appropriate amount of time to learn this for themselves. Their last major life change was arriving at HSoP. It may take more time than anticipated to help your furry friend acclimate and understand that this unfamiliar place is now home. Sometimes, they can surprise us all and feel instantly at home! Take it slow. Focus on building a strong relationship and bond with your new pet before exciting them too much with outings like car rides, hikes, or dog park visits. Give them time to establish full trust in you before taking them to new environments or inviting large groups of people into your home. We understand that having a new addition to the family is very exciting! However, it's important that they have time to properly acclimate before being introduced to all of your family and friends. Contact HSoP If you need advice, guidance, or counseling after adoption, we would be happy to help in any way we can. Please contact us with any questions and/or concerns. Call us at 208-883-1166 Email us at information@humanesocietyofthepalouse.org ​ Share your adoption Story! Thank you for adopting and giving one of our animals a second chance in life! Share your pets’ new beginning with us! We just love to hear how things are going for each of the companion animals adopted from HSoP. Your new family member had a profound impact on the lives of each of our staff members, and some shelter employees can even remember hundreds of HSoP alumni by heart! We each formed strong bonds with your pet during their stay with us, as we watched them change, grow, and in many cases, blossom into wonderful and loving companions. We are always so grateful to stay "in the loop" and hear how past shelter residents are doing. All of our staff eagerly look forward to post-adoption photos, updates, and videos. Please always feel free to share how your furry best friend is enjoying their new life! Email your story to information@humanesocietyofthepalouse.org Share them on our Facebook page.

  • Summer Pet Safety Tips | Humane Society of the Palouse | Moscow

    Summer Pet Safety Heat Wave Infographic ​ Dog Walking in the Summer ​ Dog Swimming Safety Tips Visit the vet for a spring or early-summer checkup. Make sure your pets get tested for heartworm if they aren’t on year-round preventative medication. Make sure your pet receives their flea and tick preventative, and any vaccination boosters they need. ​ Make sure your pets do not become overheated! Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water when it’s hot or humid outdoors. Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful not to over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it’s extremely hot. ​ Know the symptoms of overheating in pets. Excessive panting, difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse. Symptoms can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees. Some pets have a greater risk of heatstroke. Those pets with flat faces, overweight, senior, or any organ damage or disease are at higher risk. If you fear your pet is suffering from heatstroke call your veterinarian immediately! ​ Never leave your animals alone in a parked vehicle. ​ Do not leave pets unsupervised around any body of water (pool, lake, creek, etc.) not all dogs are good swimmers. Introduce your pets to water gradually and make sure they wear flotation devices when on boats. Rinse your dog off after swimming to remove chlorine or salt from his fur. Try to keep your dog from drinking pool water or stagnant water. Pool water can contain chlorine and other dangerous chemicals to your pets. Stagnant water (like a creek) can contain bacteria or parasites that can be detrimental to their health. Read about the dangers of blue and green algae here: https://www.aspca.org/news/pet-safety-alert-rising-dangers-blue-green-algae#:~:text=Dogs%20can%20develop%20poisoning%20when,Seizures Open un-screened windows pose a real danger to pets, who often fall out of them. Keep all un-screened windows or doors in your home closed, and make sure adjustable screens are tightly secured. ​ Feel free to trim longer hair on your dog, but do not shave your dog. ​ The layers of dogs’ coats protect them from overheating and sunburn. Brushing cats more often than usual can prevent problems caused by excessive heat. Be sure that any sunscreen or insect repellent product you use on your pets is labeled specifically for use on animals. ​ Keep walks during these times to a minimum. ​ When the temperature is very high, don’t let your dog linger on hot asphalt. Being so close to the ground, your pooch’s body can heat up quickly, and sensitive paw pads can burn. While you are walking your pooch, be sure to keep their safety in mind. It is recommended to keep your dog on a short leash in order to prevent dangers with street traffic, other pedestrians, cyclists, and other dogs. ​ Commonly used rodenticides and lawn and garden insecticides can be harmful to cats and dogs if ingested. keep them out of reach. Keep citronella candles, tiki torch products and insect coils of out pets’ reach as well. Call your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your animal has ingested a poisonous substance. ​ Remember that food and drink commonly found at barbeques can be poisonous to pets. Keep alcoholic beverages away from pets, as they can cause intoxication, depression and comas. Similarly, remember that the snacks enjoyed by your human friends should not be a treat for your pet; any change of diet, even for one meal, may give your dog or cat severe digestive ailments. Avoid raisins, grapes, onions, chocolate and products with the sweetener xylitol. Dog Swimming Safety Dog Swimming Safety Make your dog feel comfortable in the water Dogs need to learn to swim just like humans do. Although your pooch will likely be doing laps in far less time than it took you, making your dog feel comfortable in the water is an important step that you should not skip over. Playfully tossing your dog into water can be traumatizing and is never a safe or smart way to introduce a dog to the water. Tossing a stick or a ball in the water, progressively further from shore or shallow steps is an easy way to teach him to feel comfortable in the water. ​ Not all dogs are natural swimmers Don't assume your dog can swim; many dogs will never feel comfortable in the water. Dogs with large bodies and short legs don’t swim for fun; they will swim to survive. American Bulldogs are an example. For those that have mastered the doggy paddle, you should be aware that a dog’s vision decreases dramatically at night and with advancing age. ​ Clean your dog's ears after a swim Moisture in a dog's ear can set the ideal stage for an ear infection, so make sure to clean your pooch's ears thoroughly after each romp in the water. Ocean and lake water can set up nasty bacterial infections rapidly which can eat through your dog’s ear drum, giving an ear infection a whole new meaning. ​ Use caution when taking your dog to the beach Though it sounds great in theory, the beach is not always the best playground for a dog. Sand can be disastrous to get out of a long coat, and dogs don’t know to avoid stepping on jellyfish or broken shells. Dog beaches may also be teeming with roundworm eggs, among other parasites. Use caution when taking your dog to the beach and never let your dog swim out far enough to be taken by the current. Remember, if it’s not safe for you to swim, it’s not safe for your dog either. Keep the wave height, currents and bacterial levels in mind. ​ Invest in pool and water safety products for your dog Baby fences are among the simpler barriers but there are more advanced options such as pool alarms that sound when anyone falls in. Life vests for dogs are readily available and affordable. Life vests can be used for dogs learning to swim, as well as dogs who may have trouble staying afloat. ​ Train your dog to know how to exit the pool should they fall in Teaching your pup where the steps or ramp are is something that can be easily done. Provide a refresher course each swimming season. ​ Don't let your dog swim in water that's too cold Dogs, just like humans, can suffer from hypothermia in cold water, but they won’t understand the water is what is making them cold. The general rule is that if you need to get out of the water because you are getting cold, your dog is at risk of getting cold as well. ​ Dangers of stagnant water Blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) is most likely to thrive in bodies of fresh water when the weather is warm (over 75 degrees) and sunny. Algae intoxications happen more during the summer because weather conditions promote the growth of cyanobacteria. These organisms are incredibly toxic and are known to cause poisoning in dogs, cats, livestock, wildlife, birds, fish and even humans. Although many dogs drink from lakes and streams with no ill effect, microscopic organisms in that water can make you and your dog quite sick. Giardia and cryptosporidium are two of the bugs that can mess with the gastrointestinal system. Symptoms of intoxication in dogs are: panting, excessive drooling, respiratory failure, diarrhea, vomiting, disorientation, liver failure, seizures, and sudden death. If you are concerned your dog is suffering from toxic waters, call your veterinarian immediately! Dog Walking in the Summer Dog Walking in the Summer Summer has finally arrived! All of us here at HSoP are just as excited as you are for sunny days! Taking your furry friend, or a shelter dog out on walks can be one of the best parts of the summer season. Before you get ready to spend some quality time with your fur friend and enjoy some exercise together, here are some tips to help keep your companion safe. ​ Limit your walks to morning or evening. Keep the pets’ paws on grass and off pavement. Walk in areas that have lots of shade. Provide lots of water. Provide sun protection for your pet. Consider your friend's physical abilities. If the air temperature is 77°, the asphalt temperature is 125°. If the air temperature is 86°, the asphalt temperature is 135°. If the air temperature is 87°, the asphalt temperature is 143°. Limit your walks to the morning or evening: Avoid the warmest times of the day to help ensure your pets safety. Dogs are susceptible to heat stroke, so avoiding the high temperatures that occur during a nice hot summer day and walking in the morning or evening, is best. Keep your friends paws on the grass and off pavement. A good way to know if the pavement is too hot for your pooch’s pads is to press the back of your hand firmly against the asphalt for 7 seconds. ​ ​ ​ ​ Did you know that dogs also help cool their bodies through their paw pads? Overheated paw pads could equal an overheated dog. Walk in areas that have lots of shade. Help keep your pet cooler and their paw pads safe by walking in shaded areas. Provide lots of water. Dehydration is a serious concern with overheated animals. Just like we like to have a sip of water while we exercise, so does your furry friend! Avoid water puddles when out with you dog. Having a water bottle and bowl available for your pet is much safer. We never know what bacteria or other toxins are lurking in water puddles. Play it safe and provide clean water. Provide sun protection for your pet. Dogs can get a sunburn just like you or me! Providing you pet with pet safe sun screen can help keep them safe. Some dogs are more prone to sunburn than others. If your friend has a lot of white on his ears or snot, giving them, some sunscreen cuts down the risks of sunburn. Consider your friends physical abilities. Older pets, or out of shape pets are at a greater risk for heat stroke and dehydration on a sunny day. Talk with your vet about getting your friend a physical exam to make sure they’re in tip-top shape for summer. If you have recently adopted a new furry friend, ease them into their exercise routine during the warm months.

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